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  1. António Guterres that took office just before Trump is now facing the consequences and difficulties of having a US administration that is trying to approve cuts in humanitarian aid. Trump’s new radical ideas to "make America great again" through protectionism and less spending in official development assistance, put the United Nations under alert as the USA is the biggest donor for many of the UN agencies. Less resources available means also less aid for people helped by the UN.

    To achieve the goals of the Agenda 2030, the United Nations needs funding, but this is not the only challenge that the UN have to face nowadays. The world is living the worst humanitarian crisis since the UN creation, this is an importantissue of concern to the UN, because UN agencies need urgent extra funding to help more than 20 million people in need of aid assistance. EU can play an important role, Europe have the resources and the will that can help those persons affected by the extreme drought.EU has also concrete priorities established by the Rome Declaration that are related to a sustainable globalisation with focus in the people.

    As a Portuguese who knows very well the European Institutions and despite his new job, Guterres keeps a pro-Europe feeling. It was during one of his mandates as Prime Minister that Portugal had the Presidency of the Council of the European Union, during which the Lisbon Agenda was adopted and the first EU-Africa summit was held (the fifth EU-Africa summit will take place later this year).

    The European Union has been facing some internal problems, first the Euro crisis, then the rising of far-right movements due the refugees crisis and now the upcoming Brexit negotiations, but Europe is committed to help its partner countries through a development cooperation policy. It was with this background that Guterres went to the European Parliament in Strasbourg, in an attempt to captivate Europe’s attention to the current needs of the humanitarian aid, to balance the lack of American interest in the world’s problems.

    As expected, the former United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees referred to the issue of migration and asylum seekers, which is a world challenge but it has strong effects in Europe. Guterres asked for more cooperation with the UN, in order to reestablish the aid system for refugees according to international laws. He also noted that this challenge could be easily solved if EU is able to face it with full solidarity between its members.

    The UN’s top job is an apologist of prevention as modus operandi for UN and have made it clear during the speech, pointed that the new priority is “to strengthen the capacity of the United Nations both in conflict resolution, in preventing (conflict) and in sustaining peace”. Using resources to prevent humanitarian crisis is more effective and less expensive than to use resources to rebuilt a country affected by a crisis. Many crisis can be prevented by using resources to improve living conditions, people will not have to sacrifice their lives to look for better places to live if they see their rights protected in their home countries.

    As with the EU, the UN also needs reforms. António Guterres is committed to carry out reforms, in order to make the UN more effective and to rebuild the lost trust in the organisation and better answer to people’s aspirations. With common challenges and with an important role in the globalised world “a strong and united Europe is an absolutely fundamental pillar of a strong and effective United Nations”, said Guterres. 

    Both organisations were created after the WWII “to ensure peace and prosperity through a multilateral cooperation” as said by the EU Parliament President Antonio Tajani in the welcoming speech to Guterres in Strasburg. The President also referred that both organisations “have to find political solutions to the conflicts in Syria, Libya and Yemen, and to address ISIS” together in order to “defend the dignity and freedom of people”, also giving a better future to the new generations and complete the Agenda 2030.

    In his short visit to the European Parliament, Guterres also spoke about the cultural diversity, the violation of human rights and climate change (asking Europe to take the lead in this last issue), and the capacity to build a world more tolerant, fair, peaceful and prosperous.

    As Guterres said at the end of his visit to the European democracy house, “we live in a world with global challenges that need a global answer, a world in which there is not only two global powers or only one”, our world now is a chaotic multipolar order, turning necessary a EU united and strong in order to support the UN projects.Guterres left the European Parliament with the guarantee that the institution is ready for a strong cooperation and support of UN causes. 




  2. On Monday, May 15th, InterMediaKT successfully organized the workshop “Internet Media Literacy, migration and the role of online media journalism VOL II”, as part of the project #MyStory: Media, Migrants and Refugees, which aims to apply media literacy education in shaping the ways in which the migrant crisis is presented in the media and in which it is perceived by EU citizens.

    Following the event held in Patras in December 2016, the participants had the opportunity to interactively explore the ways online journalism can shape the social discourse as well as the correct use of media literacy. Katerina Chrysanthopoulou, representing JAJ:Journalists about Journalism and ΜLI:Media Literacy Institute, explained the terms "media literacy" and "news literacy", their meaning and their necessity in the information industry. Following, Veatriki Aravani, representing the International Organization for Migration (IOM Greece), presented IOM’s social media and communication strategy, analyzing main channels and tools of the organization's online communication, as well as its role as the UN Migration Agency. Moreover, the representatives of the Association of International and European Affairs (ODETH), Theoharis Livanos and Olga Tsoukala, together with Athanasios Vassilopoulos & Athena Petrosian, representatives of OneEurope Greece & Cyprus, leaded two interactive sessions respectively; on the challenges and methodological errors, when writing news articles and blogs, and the indicative methodology of writing texts when reporting on migration. Finally, Fanis Kollias and Nadir Nouri, representing Solomon, spoke about social inclusion using media as a tool.

    The seminar was held in the premises of Europe Direct City of Athens, with the kind support of Rizopoulos Post, as media partner.

    As for the representatives of the One Europe Greece and Cyprus and they said:

    ‘’In my opinion, I believe that we manage to achieve the goal of this seminar and train the young generation of journalist/bloggers into the acceptable standards of writing articles in online journalism’’ Athanasios Vasilopoulos

    ‘’In the seminar: “Media literacy, the refugee issue and the role of online journalism VOL II”

     

    We had the opportunity to show how online journalism can shape the social discourse on the refugee issue as well as the proper use of media literacy to illustrate the events.’’ Athena Petrosian


  3. The early election of the UK parliament didn't turn out to be a problem-solver as planned

    When British Prime Minister Theresa May announced on April that a snap election procedure would take place on June 8 in order to vote for a government that will take up the role of  the Brexit negotiations, nobody could have possibly predicted that the Conservative party would actually shrink instead of growing in size thus losing  the necessary parliamentary seats to form an independent government without the support of another party.

    However in Theresa May’s case “the apple fell far from the tree” in what could be considered as a win-lose situation for herself and the Conservative party. On the one hand she is in negotiations to form a coalition government with the most likely partner at the moment being the DUP (Democratic Unionist Party), but on the other hand some of her party’s MPs have lost their seats which, combined with the general result in the election, shows that Theresa May didn’t manage to achieve her goals.

    With these hugely devastating results, her expectation to command an overwhelming parliamentary majority has failed to come to fruition casting doubts over the manner in which she has chosen to conduct herself so far. Of course, the uncertainty of the results is already having a substantial effect on the UK’s economic and political stability but let us not forget the main reason these elections were called in the first place, being no other than the handling of the Brexit negotiations which will eventually lead the UK outside of the European Union either in a “soft” and possibly more acceptable way or through a “hard” Brexit which could in terms leave the UK excommunicated with fellow European states.

    But what are the main reasons that led to these terrible - for some - results? Let’s see them below:

    1) The first reason could be considered the British people, who while having voted  at first in favor of ‘Bremain’ and generally having supported the ConservativeParty decided to now vote against Theresa May mostly because her policy towards the EU negotiations seemed like it favored  a rather  “hard’’ Brexit which as I pointed out earlier would mean the cutting of all the connections with the European Union. Ms. May recently said in an interview that she called the snap election to secure a sufficient majority for her Brexit negotiations while the UKIP supports a "clean, quick and efficient Brexit" and launching his party's election campaign, Paul Nuttall stated that Brexit is a "job half done" and UKIP MP’s are needed to "see this through to the end"

    2) Secondly, another reason was the failure of the current government to prevent the recent destructive and extreme growth of terrorist attacks from members of ISIS or similar radicalized Islamistic groups. These attacks cost the British economy way too much but more importantly led to dramatic amount of civilian casualties. That was in my opinion one of the big reasons that turned many people away from voting the Conservative Party and into choosing something different than usual evidently costs many parliamentary seats for Ms.May’s political Party.

    3) Last but not least, the final reason was the recent austerity measures that managed in a rather short period of time to drive the economically “Middle” class citizens of the UK to a huge loss of money, resources and privileges. These political decisions changed some of the standards in the country and as a result, the loss of huge amounts of money ultimately raised up the total cost of living within the United Kingdom producing many sentiments of anger and disapproval for the Conservatives.

    So Brexit will, after all, be a huge expense to the British people. Naturally, Theresa May will attempt to ensure the Conservative Party maintain their position as the governing party with her at its helm to negotiate Brexit. However, dwindling support both nationally and in her own party ranks (her closest advisors, Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill in particular, being pushed out and former Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, referring to her as a “dead woman walking”) coupled with the rejuvenated opposition party means May will struggle to command authority as she had done prior to the election. This empowerment of Conservative ‘Bremainers’ leaves her in a precarious position whereby another general election will loom constantly over the next parliament, while calls for a referendum on any Bexit deal will undoubtedly continue to grow on the backbenches. 

               



  4. While Europeans and Westerns are worried about the economic crisis created by their own banks, pushing people to hard situations in countries such as Greece, the real struggle is being experienced in Africa and Middle East. More than 20 million people in just four countries are facing famine, which is considered to be the worst humanitarian crisis since WWII.

    In the beginning of the year, the vice secretary general of the UN for humanitarian affairs, Stephen O’Brien, has warned the UN Security Council that without a collective and coordinated global effort “people will simply starve to death” while others “will suffer and die from disease”. To avert a catastrophe, those 20 million people need access to humanitarian aid, for that the UN needs funds that States should proportionate, as it must be in their interests the creation of better conditions for all people.

    Children are part of the most vulnerable groups, if they do not get access to food they will suffer of malnutrition and will not be able to attend school, putting in risk their own future, but also the future of their home countries. Children are the future of a country, if they have to pass this suffering while they are young, they will lost their hopes and the social achievements in those countries would be reversed.

    Those 20 million people suffering of starvation and famine are in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen. In some cases the cause is nature-made, but unfortunately for the majority of the people affected by famine and starvation, this crisis is largely provoked by man-made.These countries have been living long droughts and conflicts, and without any humanitarian aid they are not able to face those atrocities alone.

    Nigeria as been affected by the uprising of the Islamic terrorist group Book Haram in the North-East part of the territory.Around 2.6 million Nigerians in that region had to leave their homes in search of safe areas, in order to avoid being attacked by the Book Haram or die due to malnutrition.

    Somalia have half of its population in need of humanitarian assistance and protection. The drought that affects the country was declared a national disaster, it has provoked many losses of livestocks. Without water and their incomings Somalians are moving to urban centres in search of food and water.

    South Sudan, the newest of the four countries as emerged from a civil war.Since then the country was not able to fulfill the basic needs of its population, from which around 7.5 million people need aid. To complicate the already hard situation lived by South Sudans, a cholera outbreak began last summer and is spreading through the country.

    Yemen is the new Syria, Sunni muslins are fighting Shiite muslins, supported by external powers, which provokes more destruction. Two-thirds of its population need aid, having no idea when they will have their next meal. The groups involved in the civil war do not co-operate with International Organisations in order to open corridors for international aid. Those groups should be accountable for the harm that are provoking to their own people, by not letting them receive the necessary aid to evict famine.

    The new elected UN secretary general, António Guterres, visited some of the areas affected by the drought, saying that $4.4 billion is needed in order to avert a bigger humanitarian crisis. The UN only have 10% of that value, leaving an uncertain future for those people.

    While the world faces one of its worst humanitarian crisis the Trump administration is slashing foreign aid.The United States of America are the world’s top emergency donor, but this is about to change if the Congress accepts the proposed cuts. This situation might increase the problems faced by those 20 million people, which can lead to new waves of migration to Europe and possibility more support for Islamic extremist groups.

    In a globalised world, what happens in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan or in Yemen will not only affect their neighbours but all the African continent. The worsening of this humanitarian crisis will have consequences for all world. Solutions have been found for many of the challenges faced by the today’s nations, what the world needs now is action from the world leaders in order to promote the Sustainable Development Goals, that all nations have been committed to promote and help.

    Every country has their own problems, but some problems are more urgent than others.

     

    An action today will prevent further problems in the near future.



  5. Europe Day celebrates peace and unity that was the idea of the Schuman Declaration. This year the celebrations are even more important, because the European Union is facing so many challenges. It is necessary to think what brought us together since the French Foreign Affairs Minister speech in 1950. With the election of Macron, as the next French President, Europe has to be happy. As a pro-European, is expected that the youngest French President ever will bring new ideas to the old continent, and that is what we, Europeans, need. The EU needs fresh ideas!

    The United Kingdom is about to leave our bloc but they are still our European brothers, we should not see Brexit as a nightmare, we will have to keep a strong relation with the UK if we want a strong and peaceful Europe. We, Europeans, should do more to protect the persons who arrive at our coast with the same hopes for a better life, as the Europeans that 60 years ago were looking for the same when they signed the Treaty of Rome, which has been replaced by many other treaties since then, with the most recent being signed 10 years ago - Treaty of Lisbon. Each treaty had a goal of turning EU even more strong, equal and secure for all its citizens.

    The EU has grown from just 6 members to the current 28 members. States are looking at the EU as a union which promotes peaceful cooperation, respect of human dignity, liberty, democracy, equality and solidarity among European nations and peoples. Only together we can deal with the challenges of our world, a divided Europe would mean a fragile region. Despite our differences - yes we have a lot of differences - we can work together, we have been working together for a better Europe since the World War II, and we can keep doing that for long.

    The EU is also celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Erasmus program, a program meant to be a bridge between our differences. Many young people have participated in this program, which has now been extended to other fields such as internships and volunteering. These programs have changed their lives into a more multicultural vision of what Europe is truly made of but they were also able to experience the similarities between different cultures and nations. They do not feel Portuguese or Swedish anymore, they feel Europeans.

    This year was the first time that I was present at official celebrations of the 9 May. The EU Delegation to Namibia presented a simple but cheerful event in Windhoek. I truly felt as a European citizen in that moment, and I understood what make us being under the same organisation. Namibia have only official representations from 6 members States, I was not expecting a big event, but this day brought all Europeans in Namibia together around what really unity us: the same home.

    The same home that we should respect and protect, the home where we have been growing and learning how to face the many challenges, the same home that is looked by the outside as a home of good values. We have to keep our home safe, secure and strong, we only keep this if we remain united in our values. We should respect our differences that is also what make us unique but keeping the idea that we share a big home with people from all around the world looking for the same goals searched by each of us.

    Keeping the EU strong is keeping our future peaceful and prosperous, we should fight for that, especially we the young people. The future of Europe is the youth, the EU should actively face and deal with the challenges of the new generations in order for them to not lose the European brightness left by their parents and grandparents. Young people are the next leaders of an EU that will face more and more challenges but if we remain united, we will stand stronger to face the upcoming challenges.

    Europe is me!

    Europe is you!

    Europe is us!

    Happy Europe Day!

  6. What went wrong in America?

    It seemed like a dommino effect of populism around the globe will follow after the Brexit and the election of Trump in the Oval Office. But the latest results in Dutch, Austrian and French elections proved that Europeans won't let cheap, nationalist rethoric alter their values.

    So, the question must be asked: What happened in the USA? How can "a Trump" win in America, but not in Europe?

  7. Eyes are on the Presidential Election in France all across Europe. These three young insiders are concerned about the aftermath of this historic election for France and the European Union

    As the French Presidential election draws ever nearer, OneEurope caught up with three people to discuss what this election means for France and the European Union: Cedric R.- a French expat in the Netherlands; a Macron supporter; and one half of Europe Unleashed. Jordan Jeandon, a French citizen from Dijon, currently working in Paris. Finally, we have OneEurope’s own Paris-based Millie Kershaw.

    According to Jeandon, “a large number of French citizens want to leave Europe but the reasons for doing so are different: some do not support a European system that does not respond to their concerns, others think that Europe is the veritable ruin of the French state.” Kershaw argues that the euroscepticism expressed in the first round is less an instantaneous shift, but  “more of a steadily growing opinion that has been gaining more ground year upon year,” which can be attributed to an increasing “scepticism of mainstream political parties…. and exasperation for a political system and the perceived political elite as a whole; those who many feel have proven very little when it comes to keeping promises bring about positive change to the lives of citizens.” 

    While admitting the “Front National is becoming more of an established party… it is not an insult anymore,” Cedric maintains that “France is generally not a eurosceptic country.” Citing a Euractiv poll that shows the majority of French people support the European Union, he adds that “it’s not binary- you don’t have people in favour and people who want to leave. You have people in favour, people that are indifferent and people that maybe want to leave- and over this entire poll of people, you have 57% of people that are in favour of it.”


    "It’s not the way it used to be fifty years ago.” 

    “I also understand,” Jeandon tells us, “the reason that motivates Mélanchon to refuse a Union that authorises the use of glysophates in its insecticides and it doesn’t take a strong stance on ecological matters.” Cedric, contrarily, disputes the claim that Mélenchon and Dupont-Aignan are necessarily eurosceptic to the extent that they genuinely want to leave the European Union. “I know someone who is voting for Marine Le Pen actually, and when you ask them about European Union, what they tell you is that first she will have a referendum, and then we will never exit.” Instead he postulates that “people vote for politicians like Marine Le Pen, or Mélenchon, because they are very charismatic and because what they present is nice to hear- that the issue lies at a European level.” 

    Although as he does point out, “the economical situation that we have currently in France is not the fault of Europe, it’s the fact of us not being able to make enough reform or to change our habit. The way we are working right now- the way the world is right now- it’s not the way it used to be fifty years ago.” Kershaw, however, points out that the “popularity of populism can’t be dismissed as there are concerns that need to be addressed and taken seriously when it comes to the economy and security among other issues,” and goes as far as to tie this to the fate of the European Union.

    "If the majority doesn’t agree with either En Marche! or FN reforms, nothing will change." 

    “You have two ‘France’. You have the one side of France that is successful in the economic environment, in Europe. People, basically, like me that are educated, that travel, that go and work in a different European country- that completely adhere to the model of the European Union as it is. And then you have the rest of the people who live in rural areas that are cut from education… that have difficulty finding a job, that have difficulties in Europe and that are very frustrated. These are the two France that are nowadays combatting against each other.”

    Jeandon blames the French political system for the disengagement and disenfranchisement, particularly among the latter group, and warns that “if the majority doesn’t agree with either En Marche! or FN reforms, nothing will change. “If there is no evidence of the change that was demanded by a large proportion of the country, scepticism surround the EU will continue to build… I can’t see why the FN wouldn’t be back in the final round of voting in the next presidential election if that’s the case.” Populism, Jeandon argues, will “disappear the day when the (non-populist) governments in place regain the confidence of their citizens.”

    On the other hand, Cedric does not believe merely electing Macron and reforming the system will put an end to the tide of populism either. “I think the populism will still stay high for the whole term that Emmanuel Macron will be in place. But if, at the end of the term of Emmanuel Macron as a possible president, he makes some change, make some improvement that people can really see that happening in their life, then I expect the party of Marine Le Pen to go towards what is, for me, a normal score for extreme right or extreme left which is below ten percent.” Likewise, Kershaw believes that “it’s fair to say, dependent on the success of the next five years (assuming Macron wins), lack of change and reform would propel the FN to the top spot by the next election.” Although broadly agreeing, Cedric is somewhat more precautious, suggesting that that Macron’s government “is the last stop before the extremes- because it could be Marine Le Pen, but it could be Melenchon as well."

    "I do think it would be in Europe’s best interest to carry out reform of the EU" 

    “It might trigger a civil war in France” Cedric postulates in reference to the potential enactment of Le Pen’s isolationist trade and foreign policies. “If tomorrow you closed to the border, you put some taxes on import, I think the situation will be pretty bad because we exchange a lot of goods with Germany and other countries.If you speak about jobs, I’m actually not sure having such a policy of being an isolationist will promote more job. In France, you know, we are very scared of what happened in May ‘68 when the country was completely blocked because of social unrest in the cities and also the countryside. This is, for me, a risk definitely and a threat even to the democracy because what happens tomorrow if she can’t control the population anymore?”

    “I do think it would be in Europe’s best interest to carry out reform of the EU,” Kershaw says, “seeing as France and Germany are in such precarious positions with regards to populism and Euroscepticism and the future of the Union itself.” However, calling hopes for fully-fledged European federalism under Macron “a little bit too optimistic”, Cedric points out the disparity between the Group of Four (France, Germany, Spain and Italy) who are seeking further integration and the Visegrad Group who don’t want to go beyond a single market. “I think the idea of Emmanuel Macron is to have a consultation of people to clarify the situation because… people are in favour of Europe, but the people for which they are voting are eurosceptic- I mean, something is not normal.” 

  8. Romanian politicians don't give up so easy on their fellow convicts

    Not long after the biggest protests in the history of Romania, when the Government tried to legalize some forms of corruption and release a number of inmates through an emergency decree, the ruling Social-Democrat Party didn't give up on their dream: A new law is prepared by the Senat which would PARDON inmates convicted for CORRUPTION.

    Last night, more than 1000 people gathered spontaneously in front of the Government building to protest the wicked proposal.

    How can EU sanction this kind of anti-social behaviour from the Governments within its member states?

    Is this acceptable for an EU member state in 2017?

  9. Who will be the next French President?

    It seems Macron is still leading the polls, but so did Clinton before losing to Trump. Who do you think will win the French elections and why?



  10. Erdoğan, a leader who did many essential reforms in Turkey and helped its development, since in 2003 he became Prime Minister of Turkey. In the recent years he has become more and more authoritarian and expressing his Islamic ideas, creating a cult of personality around him. From a good example to the other Middle East countries, Erdoğan is now putting Turkey in an uncertain future.

    ALWAYS THE KURDS

    Erdoğan never hided his conservative and religious ideas, he was even in prison for claiming a religious poem before he founded AKP. During his mandates as Prime-minister, he made peace with the Kurds, but he understood now that this was not the best option for him. After attacks in the Kurdistan area of Turkey, the cease fire between the Turkish Government and the Kurdish terrorist group PKK ended, now many Kurdish top-politicians are in jail, labelled of terrorists.

    When in 2015 the pro-Kurdish party HDP was able to pass the 10% elections threshold, I thought that this would prevent Erdoğan of getting his Presidential system, but I was wrong. In the 2015 election AKP won without majority. A coalition was needed, but none of the four parties represented in the Parliament agreed to form government, this held to new elections last November, after the end of the cease fire with the PKK.

    The pro-Kurdish party lost some seats, which helped AKP to reach majority, but not enough to change the constitution alone. In the beginning of 2017, 18 amendments to the Turkish Constitution were approved with MHP’s help, reducing the legislative powers of the Parliament and giving more powers to the President, a long waited wish by Erdoğan. These amendments to be approved have to pass in a national referendum that will take place on the 16 of April, while some of the HDP lawmakers are still in jail.

    A Troubled economy

    The Turkish economy that was growing fast during the first AKP mandates, is now slowing down. The problems began to intensify after the failed military coup, last July, around 130,000 civil servants lost their jobs and 45,000 have been arrested, including academics, journalists, politicians, militaries, businessmen, etc. In addition to Kurds and Kemalists, Erdoğan is now challenging as well the Hizmet movement, nowadays known by FETO, the government confiscated around 800 companies owned by Gülen supporters.

    This purge, that have been taken place since 15 July, is affecting the enviable growth of the Turkish economy. The gross domestic product is going down, the unemployment is rising, the rating agencies slashed Turkey's credit rating to junk status, the tourism sector is having troubles and the Turkish lira dropped to a historic low against the US dollar.

    All these factors combined show the fragile situation that Turkish economy is facing, but this “economic terror” it is in some part due the fear that businessmen have to invest in the “New Turkey” that emerged with the Erdoğan’ obsession for more power. As Turkey still in state of emergency, no-one knows what can happen after the referendum and markets do not like instability.

    ENEMIES EVERYWHERE

    Erdoğan created his own world, putting everyone who is not by his side in the enemy flank. Even the European Union, that helped Turkey turning into a more democratic State and its economy with European funds, is now being attacked as if it is the main source of the Turkish problems, in order to distract Turkish people from the real internal problems provoked by the increasing of President authoritarianism.

    Erdoğan with his persistence that external powers are against the development of Turkey, must have forgotten that Europe is an irreplaceable  for Turkey. Not only Europe depends on Turkey to control the influx of refugees, as Turkey depends from the European investment for a strong economy. And both are old NATO allies who must coordinate their efforts to solve the situation in Syria and find ways to prevent more terrorist attacks. Everyone has its limits and Erdoğan is pushing Europe Union too much.

    The New Turkey’s time

    Turkish citizens, however their origins and believes have the democratic power to vote and decide what they want for their home country. The future of Turkey is again in Turkish hands, but they need to understand that is not a simple change in the Turkish regime that is going on, it is something deeper that will affect the daily life. They will have to choose between a New Turkey where the death penalty is back and the one-man rule will take care of their destinies with an increasing authoritarianism, or they will choose to have a true strong New Turkey in the European Union with a democracy where freedom of speech is respected and Kurds, Alevis and other minority groups have their rights defended, as a true model for the other Middle East countries. The fight between Evet and Hayır might has been another surprise as the last referendums in Europe, but the Turkish referendum is for sure another clash between populism/nationalism against liberalism/globalisation.